Greetings "Tommy Gun!"

Here is an "observation" after viewing "Lady in the Lake" ...
I've made it a habit to leave the "reviews" to others because to do an adequate job is one heck of a lot of work.
So I'll stick to making my "observations" now and then and maybe we can have a bit of fun doing it.

Yes, Tommy Gun dared to release this video in black and white.
And in this Day and Age!
Can you imagine that?)
But don't let the lack of color put you off at all ...

Because the fully colorized version follows directly on the heels of the B & W one that preceeds it.

The killer makes his entrance, and Amanda does a rather fine job of looking worried.
You'd be worried too if some guy was pointing a gun at you, and don't think you wouldn't!
The difficulty here of course, as I guess it always is, is to stay "in character" and not crack up.

Tommy Gun is of the opinion that a different "mood" is conveyed in the B & W as opposed to the color version.
For one thing, they weren't called "Film Noir" for nothing because those blacks, whites, and grays lend a certain atomosphere of "darkness" to the subject at hand ...

The color version makes the entire episode literally brighter - and that without altering so much as a frame of the original.
And in this case I switched to the color version because it made it easier to see the killer make his entrance..

When I was a teenager growing up - or at least older - in the 1960's, following the Saturday Morning Cartoon Shows
there was always at least one television channel that made a practice of showing old movies ...
And as often as not, if it weren't a western then you could bet that you were to be treated to a gangster picture ...
Several actors devoted a major portion of their career to playing these roles ...
Edward G. Robinson was one of them ...

Here is a "colorized" version of Mr. Robinson that I believe is a painting.
I don't believe that any of his gangster films were in color.

George Raft was another actor who made much of the gangster roles ...

I don't know whether George Raft played "leading man" roles earlier in his career,
but it always struck me that he might well have done so.

My father told me that earlier in his career James Cagney was a dancer ...
(That's not so hard to believe - so was Buddy Ebsen)

Tommy Gun could have modeled himself afher Jimmy Cagney, don't you think?

Stacy Keach as a latter day Mike Hammer ... And who can forget him?

Whether black and white or in color, I thought Mr Keach the perfect Hard Boiled Detective, Mike Hammer

But the actors can't take all the credit ... What of the authors who create the characters?

Mickey Spillane came across as "hard boiled" as the detective he wrote about ... Was it really an "act?"

Harrison Ford played Indiana Jones who was neither a gangster nor a detective ...

Indy was - or is as I understand that another film is in the making - an adventurer ...
And beyond that his character is a man of the 1940's ... And that, believe it or not, is significant.

Let's return to "Lady in the Lake", shall we?
Tommy Gun opens his video with a clip of the original scene ...
Here we see the killer as he makes his entrance ...
And you will recall that throughout this somewhat mind numbing exposition,
each and every male character - be he hero or heel ...

... Is wearing a Hat!
And not some baseball cap either!
But a bona fide Fedora!

And can't you just picture Amanda during this outtake saying,

"Next time, Tommy! You've just got to get yourself a hat!"